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[[User:Katie|Katie]] [http://www.flickr.com/photos/missioncontrol/sets/72157605462136234/ dissolved one of her SmarTrip cards], and [http://www.flickr.com/photos/theqlabs/sets/72157606273822940/ so did] [[User:Q|Q]], giving us a couple of RFID chips that we'd like to hook up to antennae and eventually integrate into something wearable—perhaps a patch or cuff.  According to our understanding, the SmarTrip card is an [http://www.atmel.com/dyn/resources/prod_documents/doc2056.pdf ISO/IEC 14443 Type B card] that has a 13.56 MHz operating frequency, 10 cm operating distance (under optimal circumstances), and 106 kbps data transmission rate.  [http://dev.emcelettronica.com/AppNote/ST/AN1806 This antenna matching-circuit calculation (link not working)] and [http://www.melexis.com/prodfiles/0003929_AN90121_7.pdf this 13.56 MHz RFID systems and antennas design guide] may prove useful.   
[[User:Katie|Katie]] [http://www.flickr.com/photos/missioncontrol/sets/72157605462136234/ dissolved one of her SmarTrip cards], and [http://www.flickr.com/photos/theqlabs/sets/72157606273822940/ so did] [[User:Q|Q]], giving us a couple of RFID chips that we'd like to hook up to antennae and eventually integrate into something wearable—perhaps a patch or cuff.  According to our understanding, the SmarTrip card is an [http://www.atmel.com/dyn/resources/prod_documents/doc2056.pdf ISO/IEC 14443 Type B card] that has a 13.56 MHz operating frequency, 10 cm operating distance (under optimal circumstances), and 106 kbps data transmission rate.  [http://dev.emcelettronica.com/AppNote/ST/AN1806 This antenna matching-circuit calculation (link not working)] and [http://www.melexis.com/prodfiles/0003929_AN90121_7.pdf this 13.56 MHz RFID systems and antennas design guide] may prove useful.   


[[Category:Ongoing_Projects]]
[[Category:Previous Projects]]


I wonder if you could work one of those RFID chips into a ring or a cufflink... --The Doctor
I wonder if you could work one of those RFID chips into a ring or a cufflink... --The Doctor


[http://www.trossenrobotics.com/store/c/2966-Mifare-1S50.aspx Trossen Robotics] in Westchester, IL sells a few 13.56MHz RFID Tags that might be useful to dissect and or transplant into. Very similar to a cufflink.  I've ordered a few and will see how it works.  Right now the Antenna design is the hardest part.  How do you get enough power to the chip from an adhoc antenna? [[User:Wonderfullyrich|rich]]
[http://www.trossenrobotics.com/store/c/2966-Mifare-1S50.aspx Trossen Robotics] in Westchester, IL sells a few 13.56MHz RFID Tags that might be useful to dissect and or transplant into. Very similar to a cufflink.  I've ordered a few and will see how it works.  Right now the Antenna design is the hardest part.  How do you get enough power to the chip from an adhoc antenna? [[User:Wonderfullyrich|rich]]

Latest revision as of 20:25, 15 December 2016

Katie dissolved one of her SmarTrip cards, and so did Q, giving us a couple of RFID chips that we'd like to hook up to antennae and eventually integrate into something wearable—perhaps a patch or cuff. According to our understanding, the SmarTrip card is an ISO/IEC 14443 Type B card that has a 13.56 MHz operating frequency, 10 cm operating distance (under optimal circumstances), and 106 kbps data transmission rate. This antenna matching-circuit calculation (link not working) and this 13.56 MHz RFID systems and antennas design guide may prove useful.

I wonder if you could work one of those RFID chips into a ring or a cufflink... --The Doctor

Trossen Robotics in Westchester, IL sells a few 13.56MHz RFID Tags that might be useful to dissect and or transplant into. Very similar to a cufflink. I've ordered a few and will see how it works. Right now the Antenna design is the hardest part. How do you get enough power to the chip from an adhoc antenna? rich